Beauty and Makeup Tips
Home Beauty Skin Care Fitness & Lifestyle Body Care Hair Care Fashion Hairstyles
Homemade Beauty Recipes | Make-up | Anti-Aging | Beauty Secrets | Reviews | News
Home Beauty Hand Foot Care Athlete's Foot Picture

Athlete's Foot Picture, Cure, Symptom, treatment - Home remedy for Athlete Foot

Athlete's foot is an uncommon fungal skin infection. Athlete's foot is an infection of the feet caused by fungus. The medical term is tinea pedis. Once you have athlete's foot, it may last for a short or long time and may come back after treatment, especially if you are not careful. Tinea is a fungus that can grow on your skin, hair or nails. As it grows, it spreads out in a circle, leaving normal-looking skin in the middle.

Athlete's Foot

Athlete's foot may be treated with daily herbal footbaths. Infusions of golden seal root or a combination of red clover, sage, calendula and agrimony with two teaspoons of cider vinegar can help.

Calendula lotion applied to the affected area or direct application of tea tree or eucalyptus oil is also beneficial.

Athlete's Foot Picture

Many cases of athlete's foot can be traced to use of a public recreational facility, such as a spa, swimming pool, or locker room shower. The fungus, which grows in warm, moist environments, likes to live in the outer layers of your skin. However, for short periods of time, the fungus can live in warm puddles on the tile floor, awaiting another foot to hop onto.

Athlete's foot infections range from mild to severe and may last a short or long time. They may persist or recur, but they generally respond well to treatment. Long-term medication and preventive measures may be needed.

Athletes Foot

Symptoms and Signs of Athlete Foot

The signs of athlete's foot, singly or combined, are drying skin, itching scaling, inflammation, and blisters. Blisters often lead to cracking of the skin. When blisters break, small raw areas of tissue are exposed, causing pain and swelling. Itching and burning may increase as the infection spreads.

Athlete's foot may spread to the soles of the feet and to the toenails. It can be spread to other parts of the body, notably the groin and underarms, by those who scratch the infection and then touch themselves elsewhere.The organisms causing athlete's foot may persist for long periods. Consequently, the infection may be spread by contaminated bed sheets or clothing to other parts of the body.

What Cause of Athletes Foot?

Athlete's foot is a superficial skin infection of the foot caused by a moldlike fungus. Several fungus varieties cause athlete's foot, and sometimes more than one is present at the same time. The condition may be complicated by a secondary infection with bacteria which take advantage of the damaged skin.

Natural home remedy for the treatment and prevention of Athlete Foot

Many people will develop athlete's foot at least once in their lives. Some will get it more often. To help avoid it:

  • It is said that you should dry well between your toes after baths or showers
  • Avoid wearing tight or synthetic footwear that doesn't allow your feet to "breathe."
  • Wear sandals around pool areas, public showers, and gyms to steer clear of the fungus.
  • Wear socks that soak up wetness. Cotton is one material that does this.
  • Change your socks every day (or more frequently) if they get damp.
  • Ask your parent to buy antifungal powder to put in your sneakers or shoes.
  • Spray your shoes with a disinfectant and set them in out in the sun to help kill germs.
  • Don't share towels or footwear.
  • Keep home bathroom surfaces clean - especially showers and tubs.

Treatment of Athlete's Foot- How can I get rid of athlete foot?

Over-the-counter antifungal powders or creams can help control the infection. These generally contain miconazole, clotrimazole, or tolnaftate. Continue using the medicine for 1-2 weeks after the infection has cleared from your feet to prevent the infection from returning.

In addition:

  • Keep your feet clean and dry, especially between your toes.
  • Wash your feet thoroughly with soap and water and dry the area very carefully and completely. Try to do this at least twice a day.
  • Wear clean, cotton socks and change your socks and shoes as often as necessary to keep your feet dry.

Athlete's foot almost always responds well to self-care, although it may come back. To prevent future infections, follow the steps listed in Prevention.

Severe, ongoing infections that don't respond to 2 to 4 weeks of self-care, and frequently recurring athlete's foot, may require further treatment by your health care provider. Stronger, prescription antifungal medications may be needed. These include topical medicines, like ketoconazole or terbinafine, and pills. Antibiotics may be necessary to treat secondary bacterial infections that occur in addition to the fungus (for example, from scratching).



Spread your Buzz here..


Tips for the Manicure at home Give yourself a french manicure Nail Art Acrylic Nails Hand care
Toe Nail Nail Disorders Hand creams Good Foot Posture Choosing your Footware

Share BCG on Social Network







Share |

Nail care
Feet care
Gather your Manicure tools
Perfect Pedicure
Athlete's foot
Foot Fitness



bcg QUICK TIPS

bcg Features

Beauty-Cosmetic-Guide ELSEWHERE

Fitness & Lifestyle Beauty
Hair Care Hairstyle
Fashion Skin Diseases
Skin Care Body Care
Beauty secrets Beauty Blog
Beauty Articles Ask Advice
Reviews Beauty Recipes
How-tos Make-up
Facebook Twitter
   


© Copyright 2003-2013, www.beauty-cosmetic-guide.com. All Rights Reserved. Home | Feedback | Privacy Policy | About Us